REMEMBER: October is Energy Awareness Month

October is Energy Awareness Month, a nationwide effort to focus attention on energy efficiency and the importance of conservation to our prosperity and the health of the environment. Energy Awareness Month promotes smart energy choices and highlights the fact that we can all make decisions every day that can reduce energy use and increase sustainability.

Take action now

How can you help? Here are five simple measures you can take to save energy this month and all year long.

  • Install LEDs. Replace incandescent bulbs in your home with high-efficiency LEDs. LEDs use 80% less energy than conventional bulbs and last much longer. Remember to turn off lights whenever you’re the last one to leave a room. Purchase LED light right here.
  • Adjust the thermostat to save energy at night or when no one’s at home. If you have a programmable thermostat and you’re not using it, now’s a great time to start. Smart thermostat models include advanced features, such as remote control.
  • Pull the plug on standby power. Many electronic devices continue to use power when they’re turned off. Unplug chargers and other electronic devices when it’s convenient. Advanced power strips automatically shut off power to plugged-in devices when they’re not being used.
  • Go low flow. The typical shower sends 30 to 50 gallons of hot water down the drain. Save water and energy by installing low-flow showerheads and faucet aerators. Also, take shorter showers and reduce the temperature on your water heater to 120°F.
  • Run full loads. Your dishwasher and clothes washer use a lot of water and energy. Make the most of it by waiting until you have a full load to operate them. Air dry clothes when you can. It reduces energy use for drying and is easier on fabric, making your clothes last longer.
  • Uncover the savings in your home with PSEG Long Island’s Home Energy Analyzer, Click here to get started.

Call for help

You’re off to a great start reducing your energy use; now it’s time to call in the pros. Hire a qualified technician to inspect and clean your heating system to ensure efficient performance.

October is also a great time for a home energy audit. A qualified auditor will examine your home and provide a targeted set of recommendations to improve the efficiency and comfort of your entire house.

It may be Energy Awareness Month, but conservation is a year-round commitment. Little things, such as taking the time to turn things off when you’re not using them, can make a big difference for your family and for the environment.

Resilient students take action for a resilient environment

the child girl draws a planet of the world with colored chalk on the asphalt. Children’s drawings, paintings and concepts. Education and art, be creative when you return to school. earth, Peace day

Kudos to our schoolchildren. They are resilient and they’re committed to the causes they care about – like the environment and our planet’s future.

In March, PSEG Long Island launched an educational pilot program entitled: “I Am EM-Powered” in dozens of schools across our service area. Third through sixth grade teachers in 35 schools were excited to begin teaching the lessons we provided on environmental awareness and energy conversation. Students were equally excited, especially about the grand finale: Creating videos and vying for prizes and bragging rights in a coordinating public service announcement (PSA) contest.

The program and contest were to be part of a month-long celebration in April to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. Also included were flower seed, tree and reusable bag giveaways and cleanup and beautification projects in towns and villages across Long Island and the Rockaways.

COVID-19 canceled these other activities – but not this program.

When the pandemic closed schools, a few educators were so energized about the program that we quickly adjusted the lessons to accommodate a new virtual learning format. Rather than working in groups in their classrooms, the quarantined students were resourceful – summoning their brothers, sisters, moms and dads to participate. Some said the project helped make life under quarantine a positive family bonding experience.

The students became producers, actors and news anchors, cinematographers, videographers and video editors, and all told, there were 142 videos submitted by students from five schools. 

Thank you to teachers: Carol W. of Hempstead SD, Mark G. and Nick N. of Hicksville SD, Diana H., Suzanne G. and Frank S. of Oyster Bay-East Norwich SD, Elaine M. of South Huntington SD, and Karla M. of Uniondale SD.

Despite the unusual circumstances the coronavirus pandemic created, these teachers continued to engage their students to be advocates for protecting and saving the earth. Conserving natural resources, reducing dependency on fossil fuels and seeking renewable energy sources are essential teachings, especially for this generation. We appreciate the collaboration and commitment to spreading the word about environmental stewardship and are excited to share  a few of the students’ videos with you below:

Emma, James H. Vernon School, Oyster Bay


Madeleine, James H. Vernon School, Oyster Bay

Adiyat, Hicksville Middle School, Hicksville

Check out the rest of the videos here.

To bring this course or any of our other educational programs to your school, after-school or camp program, please contact communityli@pseg.com or visit https://www.psegliny.com/inthecommunity/communitypartnership/educationalprograms.

Through our Community Partnership Program, we offer educational programs for children of all ages related to energy conservation, electric safety and preparing for emergencies. While our in-person programs are currently paused, we are adjusting some of them to accommodate a virtual learning format and are hopeful the PSA contest will be relaunched – either in classroom or virtually – in the spring.

Now IS the right time

Linda D. – 20 year Breast Cancer Survivor, and PSEG Long Island Sr. Real Estate Representative

October 13, 2000, 20 years ago today. This is the date of my mammography – the day my breast cancer journey began. I remember it as if it were yesterday.

My former husband and I were hoping to start a family. Before any treatment, the fertility specialist ordered a battery of tests – starting with my first mammography. Two weeks later, in the office of my new breast surgeon ─ not my fertility specialist ─ I learned there was a 2.1 cm tumor growing in my right breast – “invasive ductal carcinoma.” My treatment plan was surgery, chemotherapy, radiation and then adjuvant therapy (Tamoxifen) for five years.

Nearly a year into my treatment, the terror attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon occurred. I felt a somewhat deeper connection to this tragedy as my dad helped build the Twin Towers. I also knew people who were lost their lives that day. Along with grief, sadness, fear and anger we all were feeling, I also faced the reality that I was 41-years-old and battling breast cancer. As Ground Zero still smoldered, I participated in the American Cancer Society’s Making Strides Against Breast Cancer at Jones Beach for the first time in my pink “survivor” shirt. Walking the boardwalk, I found myself surrounded by a sea of pink ribbons and photos of others who had breast cancer, mixed with hundreds of American flags and snapshots of those lost on 9/11. I wondered how many of these victims had survived cancer only to be taken by this horrific event. 

Getting pregnant was no longer in my life’s plan. My cancer was an “estrogen receptive positive cancer,” which means the estrogen hormones can actually fuel cancer growth. While the early detection of the mammogram likely saved my life, pregnancy could do the opposite.I have always been outspoken about certain causes. Breast cancer became one of them. I joined a “young survivors” advocacy group – a coalition for women diagnosed by age 40 – because younger women with breast cancer have different issues and concerns. Most specifically, breast cancer in younger women frequently grows faster and often has a not so great prognosis. Also the stigma of losing your breast, self-consciousness about body image and concerns about pregnancy after breast cancer come into play.

In March 2002, with 9/11 still weighing heavily on everyone’s mind, I went to Albany for State Lobby Day. The first lawmaker I visited was on the New York Senate Health Committee. As I tried to explain to her the unique issues facing the younger breast cancer patient, she replied ─ without missing a beat ─ “Now is not the right time.”

It’s now 2020 and a global pandemic continues to change the lives of so many.. Some may once again argue that now is not the right time to think about breast cancer, but it is. It is always the right time.

Unfortunately, COVID-19 caused many canceled mammogram appointments, breast surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments. Some people may have breast cancer right now and not even know it because they haven’t been screened. Later stage diagnoses can result in worse outcomes.

October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month – a time to educate people that breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. It’s never the right time to be told you have breast cancer, and it’s never the right time to be fighting breast cancer.

Please consider joining or supporting my team, PSEG LI Pink Transformers, because it’s always the right time to help breast cancer patients and survivors through research, education, advocacy and services.

PSEG Long Island Ready to Respond to Impact of Hurricane Isaias

PSEG Long Island has social distancing plans in place to work safely and provide excellent service

(UNIONDALE, N.Y. – Aug 1, 2020) – PSEG Long Island continues to monitor the track and the potential impact Hurricane Isaias will have on its service territory early next week. The company is ready to respond to possible power outages and is encouraging its customers to take the steps necessary to be prepared and safe.

“The current forecast is showing that Isaias will settle off Long Island as early as Tuesday morning,” said John O’Connell, vice president of Transmission and Distribution, PSEG Long Island. “We want to ensure that we have additional line and tree crews at the ready should the service territory get hit with the strong wind gusts and heavy rain currently in the forecast. Receiving support from off-island utilities and contractors who will work alongside our own highly trained line personnel will allow us to quickly and safely restore power to our customers. Utility crews will work 16-hour shifts once restoration efforts begin.”

PSEG Long Island is ensuring additional supplies are on hand, including poles and transformers, and will have additional personnel ready to respond to the approaching storm.

PSEG Long Island has made significant investments to make the electric system more resilient to the effects of extreme weather conditions. From storm hardening upgrades to ongoing enhanced tree maintenance and patrolling lines to major hospitals, proactive work allows the system to better withstand extreme weather.

“During the COVID-19 pandemic, PSEG Long Island remains committed to providing safe, reliable electric service, strong storm response and excellent customer service,” O’Connell said. “We have adapted our storm procedures to follow public health best practices and accommodate for other potential industrywide changes. As our personnel operate under these unusual circumstances to safely restore power as quickly as possible, we thank our customers for their patience and understanding.”

The safety of PSEG Long Island’s customers and employees is the company’s top priority. We ask that customers remain in their homes while crews are working nearby. If customers must speak with our crews, we ask that they practice responsible “social distancing” and remain at least 6 feet away to ensure the health of everyone involved. For more information about how PSEG Long Island continues to live up to its commitments during the pandemic, please visit http://www.psegliny.com/covid19.

How customers can prepare for a storm:

  • Ensure you have a battery-powered radio and fresh batteries.
  • Check your supply of flashlights, blankets, nonperishable food and bottled water.
  • Create an emergency communications plan.
  • Develop an evacuation plan.
  • Charge your cell phones, tablets and other mobile devices.
  • Make sure to have cash available. Banks may be closed or inaccessible after a storm.
  • Fill up your vehicle’s fuel tank.
  • Bring in unsecured objects and furniture from patios and balconies.
  • Compile a list of emergency phone numbers, including PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number: 1-800-490-0075.
  • Discuss storm and lightning safety with your family. Visit https://www.psegliny.com/safetyandreliability/stormsafety for safety tips from Sesame Street, YouTube safety videos and more.
  • Follow PSEG Long Island on Facebook and Twitter for updates before, during and after the storm.
  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Do not approach or drive over a downed line, and do not touch anything it might be in contact with. If a wire falls on or near your car, stay inside the car, call 911 and do not get out until PSEG Long Island de-energizes the line. If you MUST exit the vehicle because it is on fire, jump as far as possible away from the vehicle, with both feet landing on the ground at the same time, and hop or shuffle away.

 
Electrical safety guidelines for floods:

  • If rising water threatens your home – or if you evacuate your home – turn off your power at the circuit breaker panel or fuse box.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Don’t drive over – and don’t stand near – downed power lines.
  • Downed lines will be hard to see in the rain and can potentially be hidden in standing water. If you encounter large pools of standing water, stop, back up and choose
  •  another path.
  • If your home or business is flooded, PSEG Long Island can’t reconnect power until the electrical system has been inspected by a licensed electrician. If there is damage, an electrician will need to make repairs and obtain verification before power can be restored.

 
Stay connected:

  • Download the PSEG Long Island mobile app to report outages and receive information on restoration times, crew locations and more
  • To report an outage and receive status updates via text, text OUT to PSEGLI (773454) or visit us online at www.psegliny.com/outages
  • To report an outage or downed wire call PSEG Long Island’s 24-hour Electric Service number: 800-490-0075 or use our web chat feature at www.psegliny.com
  • Follow PSEG Long Island on Facebook and Twitter to report an outage and for updates before, during and after the storm
  • Visit PSEG Long Island’s outage information across Long Island and the Rockaways online at https://mypowermap.psegliny.com 

# # #

PSEG Long Island
PSEG Long Island operates the Long Island Power Authority’s transmission and distribution system under a long-term contract. PSEG Long Island is a subsidiary of Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. (PSEG) (NYSE:PEG), a publicly traded diversified energy company.

PSEG Long Island to Reimburse Customers for Food and Medicines Spoiled During Tropical Storm Isaias

(UNIONDALE, N.Y. – Aug 17, 2020) – PSEG Long Island is expanding its claims policy due to the COVID-19 pandemic so that customers whose electrical service was interrupted by Tropical Storm Isaias for at least 72 hours can be reimbursed for spoiled food and medication. The tropical storm knocked out power for more than 420,000 customers on Long Island and in the Rockaways, making it the most destructive storm since Superstorm Sandy.

“We recognize that losing power in August, together with the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic, was a hardship for many of our customers,” PSEG Long Island President and COO Daniel Eichhorn said. “Given the unique combination of circumstances, we believe the right thing to do is to expand our claims process to ease the burden on the customers most impacted by Tropical Storm Isaias.”

PSEG Long Island will reimburse residential customers up to $250 and commercial customers up to $5,000 for food spoilage if their service was interrupted for 72 hours or longer between Aug. 4, and Aug. 12, 2020 because of Tropical Storm Isaias.

For residential customers, food spoilage claims of $150 or less must include an itemized list. Food spoilage claims over $150 must include an itemized list and proof of loss (for example: cash register tapes, store or credit card receipts, canceled checks or photographs of spoiled items).

Separately, customers will be reimbursed for losses, up to a maximum of $300, for prescription medications that spoiled due to lack of refrigeration. Customers must provide an itemized list of the medications and proof of loss (for example: pharmacy prescription label or pharmacy receipt identifying the medicine).

Commercial customers applying for reimbursement must supply an itemized list of spoiled food and proof of loss (invoices, inventory lists, bank statements).

Customers can apply for reimbursement at www.psegliny.com/claims. The reimbursement claims cannot be processed over the phone.

Customers will have until Sept. 16, 2020 to file claims. Reimbursement is expected to take up to 60 business days from when a proper claim form is completed and submitted to PSEG Long Island.

# # #

PSEG Long Island
PSEG Long Island operates the Long Island Power Authority’s transmission and distribution system under a long-term contract. PSEG Long Island is a subsidiary of Public Service Enterprise Group Inc. (PSEG) (NYSE:PEG), a publicly traded diversified energy company.

PSEG Long Island Storm Update – August 12, 2020 10:00 p.m.

  • As of 10 p.m., PSEG Long Island reports that all of the 420,000 customers affected during the storm period have been restored. An additional 442 storm-related customer outages identified during the restoration process are expected to be completed tonight.
  • PSEG Long Island is actively restoring power to the remaining customers. The total outage map number includes new outages resulting from today’s weather activity as well as new outages we expect to see on any non-storm day. Those jobs will be restored safely and as quickly as possible.
  • PSEG Long Island utilized more than 6,500 lineworkers, tree trimmers and other field personnel, working around the clock, in 16-hour shifts.
  • In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have adapted our storm and safety procedures to follow public health guidelines and industry best practices. We thank our customers for their patience as we operate under these unusual circumstances to safely restore power as quickly as possible.

Aug. 12 update with PSEG Long Island President & COO Daniel Eichhorn

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay at least 30 feet away from downed power lines and immediately call 911 to report downed wires.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Don’t drive over – and don’t stand near – downed power lines.
  • Downed lines will be hard to see in the rain and can potentially be hidden in standing water. If you encounter large pools of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • The safety of PSEG Long Island’s customers and employees is the company’s top priority. We ask that customers remain in their homes while crews are working nearby. If customers must speak with our crews, we ask that they practice responsible physical distancing and remain at least 6 feet away to ensure the health of everyone involved. 

Other important safety notes:

  • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space.

For more information:

•  Flickr image gallery

PSEG Long Island: Storm Update – August 12, 2020 4:00 p.m.

  • As of 3:45 p.m., PSEG Long Island reports 9,180 total customers without power. Approximately 290 of that total are outages reported during the storm period, which impacted 420,000 customers.
  • Today’s work plan will focus on the remaining storm-related outages, which we expect will be completed tonight.
  • The total outage map number includes new outages resulting from today’s weather activity as well as new outages we expect to see on any non-storm day. Those jobs will be restored safely and quickly as possible.
  • PSEG Long Island currently has more than 6,500 lineworkers, tree trimmers and other field personnel working around the clock, in 16-hour shifts, until every customer is restored.
  • In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have adapted our storm and safety procedures to follow public health guidelines and industry best practices. We thank our customers for their patience as we operate under these unusual circumstances to safely restore power as quickly as possible.

For more information:

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay at least 30 feet away from downed power lines and immediately call 911 to report downed wires.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Don’t drive over – and don’t stand near – downed power lines.
  • Downed lines will be hard to see in the rain and can potentially be hidden in standing water. If you encounter large pools of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • The safety of PSEG Long Island’s customers and employees is the company’s top priority. We ask that customers remain in their homes while crews are working nearby. If customers must speak with our crews, we ask that they practice responsible physical distancing and remain at least 6 feet away to ensure the health of everyone involved. 

Other important safety notes:

  • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space.

PSEG Long Island Storm Update: August 12, 2020 11:00 a.m.

  • As of 10:54 a.m., PSEG Long Island reports 11,807 total customers without power. Approximately 1,300 of that total are outages reported during the storm period, which impacted 420,000 customers.
  • Today’s work plan will focus on the remaining storm-related outages, which we expect will be completed tonight.
  • The total outage map number includes new outages resulting from this morning’s weather activity as well as new outages we expect to see on any non-storm day. Those jobs will be restored safely and quickly as possible.
  • PSEG Long Island currently has more than 6,500 lineworkers, tree trimmers and other field personnel working around the clock, in 16-hour shifts, until every customer is restored.

Customer Outreach Centers
PSEG Long Island has five customer outreach centers open today providing free water and ice. To provide the physical distancing necessary to ensure the safety of our employees and customers, the centers offer drive-thru service. The locations open Wednesday, August 12 are:

  • Patchogue – 460 E Main St
  • Brentwood – 1650 Islip Ave
  • Greenlawn –  288 Pulaski Rd
  • Roslyn Heights – 250 Willis Ave
  • Babylon – Babylon Town Hall – 200 E Sunrise Hwy

In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have adapted our storm and safety procedures to follow public health guidelines and industry best practices. We thank our customers for their patience as we operate under these unusual circumstances to safely restore power as quickly as possible.

Aug. 11 update with PSEG Long Island President & COO Daniel Eichhorn

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay at least 30 feet away from downed power lines and immediately call 911 to report downed wires.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Don’t drive over – and don’t stand near – downed power lines.
  • Downed lines will be hard to see in the rain and can potentially be hidden in standing water. If you encounter large pools of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • The safety of PSEG Long Island’s customers and employees is the company’s top priority. We ask that customers remain in their homes while crews are working nearby. If customers must speak with our crews, we ask that they practice responsible physical distancing and remain at least 6 feet away to ensure the health of everyone involved. 

Other important safety notes:

  • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space.

For more information:

•  Flickr image gallery

PSEG Long Island Storm Update: August 12, 2020 7:00 a.m.

  • As of 6:29 a.m., PSEG Long Island reports 15,528 total customers without power. Approximately 1,700 of that total are outages reported during the storm period, which impacted 420,000 customers. The total number includes new outages resulting from this morning’s weather activity.
  • Today’s work plan will focus on the remaining storm-related outages, which we expect will be completed tonight.
  • PSEG Long Island currently has more than 6,500 lineworkers, tree trimmers and other personnel working around the clock, in 16-hour shifts, until every customer is restored.
  • New outages not directly related to the storm continue to be reported and assessed, as on any non-storm day. They will be restored as safely and quickly as possible.

Customer Outreach Centers
Due to the extended power outage, PSEG Long Island will open five customer outreach centers today. The centers will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (or while supplies last), providing free water and ice. To ensure we maintain the physical distancing necessary for the safety of our employees and customers, the centers will offer drive-thru service.
The locations open Wednesday, August 12 are:

  • Patchogue – 460 E Main St
  • Brentwood – 1650 Islip Ave
  • Greenlawn –  288 Pulaski Rd
  • Roslyn Heights – 250 Willis Ave
  • Babylon – Babylon Town Hall – 200 E Sunrise Hwy

In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have adapted our storm and safety procedures to follow public health guidelines and industry best practices. We thank our customers for their patience as we operate under these unusual circumstances to safely restore power as quickly as possible.

Aug. 11 update with PSEG Long Island President & COO Daniel Eichhorn

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay at least 30 feet away from downed power lines and immediately call 911 to report downed wires.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Don’t drive over – and don’t stand near – downed power lines.
  • Downed lines will be hard to see in the rain and can potentially be hidden in standing water. If you encounter large pools of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • The safety of PSEG Long Island’s customers and employees is the company’s top priority. We ask that customers remain in their homes while crews are working nearby. If customers must speak with our crews, we ask that they practice responsible physical distancing and remain at least 6 feet away to ensure the health of everyone involved. 

Other important safety notes:

  • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space.

For more information:

•  Flickr image gallery

PSEG Long Island Storm Update: August 11, 2020 9:45 p.m.

  • As of 9:29 p.m., PSEG Long Island reports 15,754 total customers without power. Approximately 1,900 of that total are outages reported during the storm period, which impacted 420,000 customers.
  • Our work plan for the rest of Tuesday and through the overnight hours is to address the largest remaining neighborhood outages with crews spread across Long Island and the Rockaways.
  • Outages impacting individual service lines to homes will be completed on Wednesday.
  • PSEG Long Island currently has more than 6,500 lineworkers, tree trimmers and other personnel working around the clock, in 16-hour shifts, until every customer is restored.
  • New outages not directly related to the storm continue to be reported and assessed, as on any non-storm day. They will be restored as safely and quickly as possible.

Customer Outreach Centers
Due to the extended power outage, PSEG Long Island will open five customer outreach centers tomorrow. The centers will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. (or while supplies last), providing free water and ice. To ensure we maintain the physical distancing necessary for the safety of our employees and customers, the centers will offer drive-thru service. The locations open Wednesday, August 12 will be:

– Patchogue – 460 E Main St
– Brentwood – 1650 Islip Ave
– Greenlawn –  288 Pulaski Rd
– Roslyn Heights – 250 Willis Ave
– Babylon – Babylon Town Hall – 200 E Sunrise Hwy

In response to the COVID-19 outbreak, we have adapted our storm and safety procedures to follow public health guidelines and industry best practices. We thank our customers for their patience as we operate under these unusual circumstances to safely restore power as quickly as possible.

Aug. 11 update with PSEG Long Island President & COO Daniel Eichhorn

Customer Safety:

  • Downed wires should always be considered “live.” Stay at least 30 feet away from downed power lines and immediately call 911 to report downed wires.
  • Electric current passes easily through water, so stay away from downed power lines and electrical wires. Don’t drive over – and don’t stand near – downed power lines.
  • Downed lines will be hard to see in the rain and can potentially be hidden in standing water. If you encounter large pools of standing water, stop, back up and choose another path.
  • The safety of PSEG Long Island’s customers and employees is the company’s top priority. We ask that customers remain in their homes while crews are working nearby. If customers must speak with our crews, we ask that they practice responsible physical distancing and remain at least 6 feet away to ensure the health of everyone involved. 

Other important safety notes:

  • To prevent carbon monoxide poisoning, do not run any gasoline-powered generators in a garage or any other enclosed space.

For more information:

•  Flickr image gallery